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Article

Cloud Security: Not an Oxymoron

The realities of security practices at leading cloud providers

Some businesses today are nervous about moving to cloud-delivered technology because it means allowing their system data to reside somewhere other than their own data center. For some, this can be a tough concept to grasp, especially for those who have spent 25 years or more hosting their company's systems and data. But cloud computing providers could not exist without implementing strong security controls for their customers' information. The reality is that leading cloud solutions include security features well beyond what most manufacturing companies can afford to implement on their own.

In this article readers will learn about some realities of the security practices at leading cloud providers and the questions that should be asked by those considering use of a cloud solution.

Does the cloud solution have a risk assessment process that addresses risks to information assets?
The starting point of an effective security process is the identification of the information security risks for the cloud provider. Risk assessments are performed to identify the various sources of information and how the information might be breached. There are a number of different risk assessment models that exist and cloud service providers should have a process to identify information risks. After identifying risks, the company can then develop controls to mitigate those risks.

Has the cloud solution implemented documented security policies and procedures?
Based on risks identified through the risk assessment process, the cloud service provider should develop a set of policies and supporting procedures to implement necessary controls to address its risks. Ad hoc policies and procedures or those that are not documented and implemented at a cloud service provider should raise red flags. Instead, sophisticated security policies and procedures should be implemented that establish the organization's practices and are required, ultimately establishing accountability for achieving control objectives.

Does the cloud solution perform security vulnerability or penetration testing?
Penetration or vulnerability tests are scans against the company's infrastructure to determine whether there are any security vulnerabilities (for example, a critical system patch that hasn't been applied where hackers could exploit this weakness). The purpose of these types of tests are to identify where systems might be subject to internal or external attacks and to identify what measures can be taken to protect against or eliminate these threats. Companies with good security practices regularly perform these tests and take actions to respond to threats identified.

What measures have been implemented by the cloud solution to physically protect their data center?
Physically secure data centers are critical to protecting cloud systems. Cloud providers should be able to provide state-of-the-art data centers with restricted access and sufficient physical barriers to prevent unauthorized access attempts. Well-protected data centers can be very costly and many manufacturers cannot afford to provide the level of security attained by cloud providers.

What types of third-party audits are performed for the cloud solution?
There are a number of third-party audits that cloud service providers may obtain. Third-party audits provide independent assurance related to various operations of the cloud provider. Reports that are common in the cloud industry include SOC 1, SOC 2 and in some cases, SOC 3 reports, which are "Service Organization Controls" audit reports performed and signed by a certified public accountant. These reports cover different types of controls at cloud service providers. These reports can be a valuable source of information related to controls at the cloud provider.

More Stories By Tom DeCoe

Tom DeCoe is Plex Systems’ vice president of infrastructure and is responsible for defining the strategic development of the Plex Manufacturing Cloud and ensuring its technology meets and exceeds customers’ requirements to support efficient business processes in the manufacturing enterprise. He is a graduate of Central Michigan University with a BS in Computer Science and Math.

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